Guide: Most Affordable NYC Summer Internship Housing

WayUp
Guide: Most Affordable NYC Summer Internship Housing

This post is brought to you by Kopa—a digital platform for finding temporary housing in places like NYC.

After you land an internship in New York City (maybe with the help of WayUp), you’re flooded with feelings of relief and excitement. But this excitement is often replaced by stress and panic as you realize you need to find a place to live. It’s no secret that NYC has a high cost of living. (FYI, Monica’s apartment in “Friends” would actually cost $14,000/month.) Add in unfamiliarity with the city, neighborhoods, and boroughs, and finding housing can be a nightmare.

However, there is housing that you CAN afford, and it’s not as hard to find as you might think!

How to Find Housing

During the summer, many college students leave their campus housing for summer break. Institutions like New York University (NYU), School of Visual Arts, The New School, Fashion Institute of Technology, and Columbia University convert their residence halls and other student housing into summer intern housing. However, if you don’t want to rely on educational housing services, there are other options available.

Kopa helps interns find summer housing by connecting renters with individual hosts. So, if you’re looking for an apartment with amenities like wifi, air conditioning, and a private bathroom, it’s worth looking at the properties available through Kopa. They can even help you find compatible housemates and split the rent so you don’t have to worry about having awkward conversations.

1. Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Typical residential buildings in Bed-Stuy. | Photo credit: Eli Duke

Commonly referred to as Bed-Stuy, this neighborhood is located near the popular (and more expensive) neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Bushwick. It’s bordered by Flushing and Broadway Avenue and offers historic brownstones, small restaurants and stores, and plenty of trees and community gardens.

Transit Score: 8/10

Subway lines A and C can get you to the Financial District in 30 minutes, but you may have to walk a bit to a station if you live in the middle of the neighborhood. You can also choose to bike the 5-6 miles into Lower Manhattan. With all there is to do in Bed-Stuy and the surrounding neighborhoods, it’s easy to walk to restaurants and entertainment.

Top sights and attractions:

  • LunAtico: Owned by three musicians, this cocktail bar offers ecletic live music.
  • Richard Beavers Gallery: A gallery showcasing work from up and coming artists who focus on issues facing the Black community.
  • A&A Bake and Double and Roti Shop: A casual Trinidadian bakery and restauarant known for their doubles – flatbreads oozing with various fillings and chutneys.

Average price per 1 bedroom: $2,250

Average price per single room: $1,200

2. Ridgewood, Queens

Many parts of Ridgewood consist of rowhomes in friendly communities. | Photo credit: Timothy Krause

Located at the southwest edge of Queens, Ridgewood has a family-friendly feel with housing options ranging from apartments in rowhomes to rooms in multi-family homes. While the area is largely residential, new restaurants and shops are poping up, and the hip area of Buskwick is within walking distance.

Transit Score: 7/10

If you’re heading into your summer internship in Midtown, you’ll be able to hop on line M for a 40 minute ride. Walking to attractions in the area is easy to do.

Top sights and attractions:

Average price per 1 bedroom: $2,150

Average price per single room: $1,200

3. Washington Heights, Manhattan

Washington Heights is located close to/better known as Harlem and Upper Manhattan. | Photo credit: Allie Smith

This neighborhood is quickly becoming a hip enclave for millennials, with more restaurants and shops opening up. The area has a smaller population density and larger living spaces than the rest of Manhattan.

Transit Score: 7/10

Even though it’s in Manhattan, Washington Heights is located over ten miles from the Fiancial District. You’ll have easy access to to Upper Manhattan and Midtown, but plan to bike or take a 40 minute subway ride to Lower Manhattan.

Top sights and attractions:

  • The Cloisters: A Metropolitan Museum focusing on Medival art and architecture.
  • The High Bridge: The oldest bridge in the city, it now serves as a pedestrian walkway between  and The Bronx. Manhattan
  • Sweet Life Pastry: A friendly spot offering baked goods and Mexican fare.

Average price per 1 bedroom: $1,800

Average price per single room: $1,150

4. Astoria, Queens

Astoria buildings vary in architectural style and size. | Photo credit: Ed Johnson

With small family restaurants, hip new bars, older family homes, and new apartment buildings, Astoria has it all. Rental prices in this neighborhood vary depending on the type of real estate you live in and how close you live to subway lines.

Transit Score: 7/10

With lots to do in Astoria, it’s easy to walk to parks, restaurants, and bars. However, if you need to head into Lower Manhattan, you’ll need to hop on the N or W trains for a 30-40 minute ride.

Top sights and attractions:

Average price per 1 bedroom: $2,600

Average price per single room: $1,600

5. Fordham, The Bronx

Fordham has plenty of tenement buildings like these. | Photo credit: Nate Bolt

With lots of young residents and the presence of Forham Univeristy, Fordham feels a bit like a college town. It contains a lot of tenement buildings and has a bit of a grungier feel than the other neighborhoods on this list.

Transit Score: 6/10

The B, D, and 4 trains can take residents into the Finanical District and Southern Manhattan. However, expect a ride of at least 45 minutes.

Top sights and attractions:

Average price per 1 bedroom: $1,750

Average price per room: $1,050

Finding Housing that Suits You

Whether you’re looking to sublet a small room, live in a house with a big living room and 5 roommates, or just find a place where you can start your journey to becoming a New Yorker, these neighborhoods are good places to look for housing.