How to Answer: Tell Me About a Time You Made a Mistake

Although no one likes talking about their mistakes, being able to discuss your past mistakes in a job interview can actually be a great way of impressing the interviewer. So when you encounter a question like, “Tell me about a time you made a mistake,” during an interview for an internship or entry-level job, you should focus on how you dealt with the mistake and what you were able to learn from it. When the hiring manager asks this question, it’s not because they’re trying to trip you up; rather, it’s a chance for the interviewer to see that you are able to acknowledge your mistakes and learn from them, two very important qualities. An employer would rather hire candidates who admit and grow from their mistakes than those who think they never make any.

As with any frequently asked question, it’s important to make sure you have an answer prepared before you go in for the job interview. These tips will help you describe a time you made a mistake in a way that will make it clear you’re the right person for the job.

Be honest

It’s important to be able to admit that you’re capable of making mistakes (as we all are), and that you’re willing and able to admit it. Therefore, you should refer to an actual mistake you made instead of attempting to appear that you don’t make any.

Take responsibility

It’s tempting to catalog how other people’s actions led to your error. But if you spend time during your interview talking about all the ways in which others — or the company itself — failed, you’re not actually admitting you made a mistake. Instead of pointing the finger at others, acknowledge the role you played. Your answer should be related to work; the interviewer doesn’t want to hear about the argument you had with your parents. Nor do you want to reveal any mistakes that could indicate a lack of professionalism on your part. Stick with school or work-related issues that stemmed from a true oversight or misunderstanding:

Highlight the resolution

Make sure to spend time discussing how you addressed the problem and outline the concrete steps to took to rectify it. The interviewer will want to know how you handle complications.

Emphasize lessons learned

Demonstrate that the mistake you made was not in vain. The interviewer wants to know that you can learn from your mistakes and take action to make sure they don’t happen again. By concluding the story of your mistake with what you learned, you can frame the incident in a positive light and show that you’re able to grow from your mistakes.

Say something like: “At my previous internship, I underestimated the amount of time I would need to work on a presentation for a team meeting. I was still getting used to the workflow in a busy office so I didn’t realize that I would need an extra few hours to put a deck together. Luckily, I managed to catch the mistake before the presentation was due to take place and asked my manager for help to complete it in time. It was a valuable lesson in time management and I’ve become better at prioritization and mapping out my schedule as a result of that experience.”

While it can be awkward to discuss mistakes you’ve made, your ability to do so is an asset. Interviewers know it’s a difficult question, and that’s why the right response will signal that you’re the right candidate for the job.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Dress for a Job Interview at a Nonprofit and find answers to common interview questions such as What Motivates You?

How to Answer: Tell Me About Yourself

“Tell me about yourself,” is one of the most frequently asked questions in an interview. In fact, it’s usually the first one. The key to answering it well is to be concise but informative. Keep the answer to under 60 seconds and focus on how your skills and personality traits are related to the position you’re interviewing for.

Approach it as if you just wrote an autobiography and you have to summarize it in four sentences. Focus on the highlights: Talk about where you’re from, your major and your future goals. Then add on a sentence at the end that describes why you’re sitting in the interview and why you’d be a good fit for the role.

Here’s how to do it.

Talk about your background.

Answering this question well is about more than just mentioning your skills or professional experience. It’s also about putting those things into context with the rest of your life. At the beginning of your answer you should explain where you’re from, where you’re attending school and what you’re majoring in.

Describe your interests.

Next, talk a little bit about your interests including what led you to apply for the role. For example, if you’re passionate about journalism, explain why the field excites you and why you’d like to be a part of it.

Mention your past experience.

Once you’ve described your interests, explain how your past internship and work experience have shaped your decision to seek out this role. If you don’t have previous experience in the field (or a related on) you can talk about relevant classes you’ve taken or transferable skills you’ve developed through class projects or extracurriculars.

Explain why you’re excited about the opportunity.

Wrap up your answer with one sentence explaining why you’re excited about this opportunity. Be sure to mention something you admire about the position or the company, and connect it back to your goals.

Say something like: “I’m originally from New York City and I’m currently a Junior at UT Austin. I decided to study English because I’ve always loved reading and writing and studying literature in general. I’m now looking to gain experience in the world of journalism, a field I’m passionate about because of its ability to inform and engage readers. I’ve written extensively for my campus newspaper, reporting on campus news and events, and I’m excited to gain more valuable reporting experience by working on the types of stories your company publishes.”

Once you have your answer nailed down, practice it in the mirror several times. This will help you get comfortable with all the points you want to emphasize and will ensure that you sound confident without being stiff.

Answering “Tell me about yourself” is the first step in connecting with your interviewer and a great chance to distinguish yourself from the majority of candidates who may be fumbling over their answer. So practice your story to make sure it reflects the thoughtfulness and detail you’ve put into your response and go into the interview confident that you’ll be putting your best foot forward.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as 6 Things to Do in Your First Week at a New Job and find answers to common interview questions such as Tell Me About an Accomplishment That You’re Most Proud Of.

How to Answer: What Are Your Strengths?

 “What are your strengths?” is a go-to question for interviewers. The key to answering it correctly is knowing that the hiring manager is trying to find out not only what you’re good at, but also how your skills match up with the company’s needs. This is closely related to “What can you offer us that someone else can’t?” another common question you’ll encounter during the interview process, and it’s a great chance to show off your professional strengths while demonstrating that you’re a great fit for the position!

Here are some tips to help you answer this question perfectly.

Highlight your top 3 strengths.

Before your interview, start by making a list of 10 skills and personality traits you’re proud of. This should include everything from your technical skills (like writing or knowledge of social media platforms) to soft skills like your ability to make friends easily (which shows that you’re a people person), and education-based skills such as training from college classes or past internships. If you need help coming up with this list, try brainstorming with friends or asking professors to weigh in on what they think you’re really good at. Once you have your top 10 strengths, narrow it down to the 3 things you’re most proud of. Be self-aware but not too modest. It’s totally okay to say that you’re a talented writer or a great programmer, and being confident will impress your interviewer.

Pro tip: Be creative! You might be awesome at punctuality, but your interviewer has probably heard that from lots of other candidates already. Instead, figure out what sets you apart and lead with that. For example, if you’re applying for a position where you’ll be managing projects and you have previous project management experience, this is a great time to mention that!

Give concrete examples.

Once you’ve figured out your top 3 strengths, come up with 1-2 examples to back up each one. If you’re going to say that one of your greatest strengths is being organized, then make sure you have evidence to prove that. Preparing a script of this can be a good idea. In addition to making you more comfortable with your answer, it’ll also help you sound more authentic because you’ll be confident that the things you’re talking about are things you’re really great at.

Say something like: “I’m really strong at communication, leadership and project management. Whenever I’m working on a group project, I naturally take on the role of project manager, leading the team by assigning tasks and making sure that everyone knows what they’re responsible for. At my last internship, I was asked to manage a project involving our team of interns. I took the lead on assigning tasks to the team and used the project management platform Trello to ensure that everyone was up to speed on what was expected of them. I also made sure that team members were communicating with each other on a daily basis so that we didn’t fall behind.”

Relate your strengths back to the job.

Once you’ve outlined your strengths and given solid examples of how you display them, wrap up your answer by connecting your strengths back to the position you’re applying for. You don’t need to focus on how your strengths relate to the job specifically (since this can sound too practiced), but do mention why these skills would make you an asset to any team.

Say something like: “We were able to complete the project on time and under budget, delivering a successful solution that our manager was able to share with a client. This made me realize that project management, leadership and communication are things I’m good at, and I’m excited to continue applying those skills in a professional setting.”

Here’s how to bring it all together:

“I’m really strong at communication, leadership and project management. Whenever I’m working on a group project, I naturally take on the role of project manager, leading the team by assigning tasks and making sure that everyone knows what they’re responsible for. At my last internship, I was asked to manage a project involving our team of interns. I took the lead on assigning tasks to the team and used the project management platform Trello to ensure that everyone was up to speed on what was expected of them. I also made sure that team members were communicating with each other on a daily basis so that we didn’t fall behind. We were able to complete the project on time and under budget, delivering a successful solution that our manager was able to share with a client. This made me realize that project management, leadership and communication are things I’m good at, and I’m excited to continue applying those skills in a professional setting.”

Answering “What are your strengths?” is a great chance to highlight the things you’re great at and to show a potential employer that you’ve thought about what will make you a great addition to the team. Even if the interviewer doesn’t ask this question directly, finding a way to relate your strengths to the job you’re applying for is a key component of impressing the interviewer. By coming up with your top 3 strengths and giving thoughtful examples of each, you’ll have no problem showing that you’re the best person for the job.

 

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Use Social Media to Network Online and find answers to common interview questions such as Are You Willing to Travel?

How to Answer: What Are Your Weaknesses?

“What are your weaknesses?” is the flip side of the coin to “What are your strengths?”  and a great chance to show potential employers that you’re proactive about self-improvement. There are two key parts to this answer: confessing your weaknesses and showing that you’re working to address them. It’s important to realize that the interviewer is less concerned with your specific weaknesses (after all, everyone has them) and more concerned with your self-awareness and desire to improve.

Here are some tips to help you nail this interview question.

Pick a weakness that doesn’t affect your ability to do the job.

Narrow down your answer to only your biggest weakness. Since the interviewer is really looking for candidates who are self-aware and proactively trying to improve, talking about one main issue will give you a chance explain the steps you’ve taken to address the problem and, more importantly, not give the interviewer a reason to turn you down.

The weakness you pick shouldn’t take away from your ability to do the job or to fit in with the company, but it also shouldn’t come across as unrealistic or staged. Don’t say something like, “I’m too much of a perfectionist.” Your interviewer probably won’t believe it (this is no one’s biggest weakness) and it doesn’t give you a lot of room to elaborate on how you’ve taken actionable steps to address the issue. Instead, focus on the things you’ve struggled with in the past, like managing your time when you a have a busy class schedule, not speaking up for yourself during a class project, or not asking for help when you need it.

Pro Tip: Keep this focused and concise. You want to give the interviewer the sense that you’re self-aware, but you don’t want to dwell on all the ways your weakness has held you back. Try to frame your weakness in one sentence.

Walk through the steps you’ve taken to address the problem.

Once you’ve opened up about your weak point, demonstrate your ability to problem-solve by talking about how you’ve worked through the problem and mention some of the successes you’ve had as a result. End on a positive note and, if possible, tie the positive outcome back to the job you’re interviewing for.

Say something like: I’ve always loved connecting with people and I tend to do that very well in person. However, my writing skills aren’t as strong as I would like them to be over email and in proposals. I’ve taken a writing class and I’ve seen my writing improve, but it’s something that I still need to work on. To make sure that I’m actively addressing the problem, I always ask for feedback when writing papers for class, and I include at least one English class in my schedule every semester. Although writing is one of my weaknesses, I’m taking active steps to get better and I know that I can become a good writer if I keep working on it.

Although identifying your weak points might be a bit uncomfortable at first, answering “What are your weaknesses?” is a great opportunity to show that you’re able to identify and address problems in a proactive way. This is a skill that employers always look for and something that will help you stand out in a pool of other candidates.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as What to Do When You Want a Second Job Offer and find answers to common interview questions such as Would You Describe Yourself as a Leader or a Follower?

How to Answer: What’s Your Dream Job?

 Chances are you’ve asked yourself this question at some point. Even if you haven’t figured out all of the details, you might have a sense of what you’d like to do. Like the related question “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?”, this question is designed to give the interviewer a sense of how your goals align with those of the company you’d like to work for. They want to see that you’re ambitious and that the position you’re interviewing for fits into your long-term plans.

The best way to prepare your answer to this question is to spend a few minutes writing out a description of what your dream job might look like. Be sure to include things like what you’d like to do and who you’d like to work with. Then compare that description to the description of the job you’re interviewing for. Focus on the things that show up in both lists and talk about why those things are exciting to you.

Here are some tips to help you prepare your answer.

Explain your dream job.

This is a great way to start your answer because it will give the hiring manager some insight into your long-term goals and help them understand why you’re applying for the position in the first place. Keep this part of your answer short (one sentence is fine) and be sure to give some context by explaining what part of your dream job appeals to you.

Say something like: “My dream job is to one day be a lead product manager, creating and scaling innovative tech products.”

Mention how your values align with the company’s values.

While your skills are definitely a key part of landing the job you want, your values also play a significant role in showing how the position you’re interviewing for fits into your goals for the future. What are “values”? They can be a lot of different things, including work-life balance, salary, vacation time and company culture. Having values that overlap with those of the company you’d like to work for is especially important for entry-level jobs because hiring managers are looking for candidates who are committed to sticking with the organization.

Say something like: “Because of my passion for digital platforms, I want to be involved in working on projects like the ones your company is working on, especially because I love working in places that put an emphasis on collaborative environments and teamwork.“

Connect your future goals to the position.

Letting the interviewer know that you’re ambitious is great, but in addition to talking about the kind of position you want to have in the future, you should also talk about what you can learn from this role and how this will help shape your career path within the industry. Be sure to mention that you’re interested in the position for the long term. This will show employers that you’re committed to them and will be sticking around.

Say something like: “I know being a Lead PM is a big goal, so I’m ready to do everything I can to develop my skills and work alongside talented people.”

Here’s how to bring it all together:

“My dream job is to one day be a lead product manager, creating and scaling innovative tech products. Because of my passion for digital platforms, I want to be involved in working on projects like the ones your company is working on, especially because I love working in places that put an emphasis on collaborative environments and teamwork. I know being a Lead PM is a big goal, so I’m ready to do everything I can to develop my skills and work alongside talented people.”

Pro tip: Although you may be excited about the job you’re interviewing for, unless it really is your dream job, don’t say it is. Interviewers are much more likely to be impressed by a sincere response related to skills or values that are in line with the position.

Answering “What’s your dream job?” is a great chance to show the interviewer that you’re ambitious and forward-thinking, while also having the skills and values that will make you a great employee. By highlighting your great qualities and giving a thoughtful answer about how the position you’re interviewing for will help you achieve your long-term goals, you’ll really impress the interviewer and get one step closer to landing the job.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as What to Do After You Get a Job Offer and find answers to common interview questions such as How to Answer: Tell Me About a Time You Made a Mistake.

How to Answer: What Motivates You?

 Some of the most common interview questions can also be the most challenging to answer. “What motivates you?” is a deceptively simple one. It can give your future employer a sense of your aspirations and long-term goals. It can paint a picture of why you get up in the morning and what makes you tick. How you choose to answer this question can either give a hiring manager a compelling reason to remember you or it can unintentionally leave you looking uncertain, or worse, indifferent.

This question can make or break your job interview, so here are a few key insights to consider as you prepare to answer: What motivates you?

Reflect.

If you try to come up with an answer to this question on the spot, you’ll likely sell yourself short. This is an opportunity to demonstrate strong self-awareness and it requires thoughtful reflection to get the answer just right. A helpful strategy can be to think about the times in your life where you felt the most driven and inspired, whether in a previous internship, in your classes, on a sports team or as part of another extracurricular activity. Personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator can also illuminate new ways to identify and articulate your passions and strengths. For example, if you find that you are most motivated while prepping for final projects or getting ready for a championship game, you can share that having clear and ambitious end goals is important to you.

It can be equally essential to reflect on what activities or spaces leave you feeling discouraged or unmotivated. Taking the time to identify these energy-drainers can help you avoid work settings that may not be a good fit, particularly if you’re looking for your first entry-level job and are still trying to understand type of job will work best for you.

Be authentic.

Hiring managers can quickly tell if you’re being genuine about your motivations. Generalized responses like “I love working with others” tend to be easily forgotten. Overly catered responses could look insincere. You are most compelling when you are authentic. Look at the job description and pull out what you are genuinely excited about. If you’re eager to work on a close-knit team and you see that this role has highly collaborative project management, that’s a great place to dive in. Alternatively, if you get energy from being around others, but this job has you doing predominately independent work like data analysis, that’s something you need to consider carefully.

Keep it concise, positive and connected.

“What motivates you?” is a broad question, so it can be tempting to rattle off a long list of things that get you excited to wake up in the morning, but a compelling response will be succinct, grounded in previous accomplishments, and connected to the job at hand. Curate a list of two to three key motivators accompanied by 1) a specific example of when this motivated you and 2) how you see this playing out in the job that you’re applying for.

Say something like: “I’m very motivated when doing work that positively affects others’ lives. As part of the community service that I do on campus, I had the opportunity to come up with a service project with other team members, and I found that I’m at my personal best when I have the chance to be both creative and service-oriented. I’m excited to see that this job also focuses on fostering a service-oriented mindset.”

Pro Tip: Whatever you say, don’t say money. Salaries are certainly important, but money should never be the primary motivating factor that you share in an interview.

Below are some potential motivating factors and ways to connect what motivates you to job descriptions:

Bringing out the best in others → Example: Laterally managing teammates to their greatest potential
Creative expression → Example: Innovating new solutions to complex problems
Working in teams → Example: Encouraging collaborative practices across teams and departments
Making a difference → Example: Upping the standards for inclusive processes
Winning or competing → Example: Setting and achieving ambitious goals in ambiguous contexts

Self-reflecting on the front-end and identifying what truly motivates you will not only narrow down your job search to a list of more meaningful opportunities, but it will also help you feel confident walking in on interview day. For other ideas on how to get noticed by hiring managers, check out our advice on how to stand out during a job search.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as Advanced Tips to Make Your Resume Stand Out and find answers to common interview questions such as What Was Your Favorite Class?

How to Answer: Are You Willing to Travel?

“Are you willing to travel” is a common interview question, especially if the company you’d like to work for has multiple locations or you’re applying for a sales or consulting position. When a hiring manager asks this, along with related questions like, “Are you willing to relocate?” it’s to determine your level of flexibility and your commitment to the position and the company.

Here are some things to keep in mind when preparing your answer.

Do your homework.

If the job description states that the position requires travel, apply only if you’re willing and able to do so. Do some research about how much travel is typically required for the position you’re applying for so when the interviewer follows up by asking how often you are able to travel, you can give an appropriate answer. For example, if you’re applying for a job as a campus recruiter for a particular company, you should know that you’ll be traveling quite a bit during the academic year when you attend college career fairs and major industry conferences.

Find out the details.

If the job description and interviewer don’t outline the travel requirements, you should be prepared to ask. In fact, asking questions will show your prospective employer that you’re really interested in the role and invested in making it work for both parties.

Tell the truth.

Be upfront about how much you’re able to travel during any given timeframe. Even if you’re willing to travel every week, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you can take off for London at a moment’s notice. Be sure to frame your answer in terms of what you’re able to do, demonstrating flexibility and wrap up by asking the hiring manager to offer more details on the travel requirements.

Say something like: “I’m definitely willing to travel, and actually love traveling! I’ll admit that I have some prior commitments that prevent me from traveling every weekend, but I’m more than happy to travel every week if necessary. Do you know how much traveling would be expected of me?”

Above all, make sure to focus on what you can do for the company and not the other way around. By doing your homework beforehand, asking follow-up questions and being honest, you’re positioning yourself as a strong and memorable applicant.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Deal with Multiple Internship Offers and find answers to common interview questions such as How Have You Displayed Leadership?

How to Answer: Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?

The key to answering “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?” and related interview questions like “What’s your dream job?” is to show potential employers that you’re thoughtful about your career path and your future ambitions. When employers ask this question, they want to know that you’re motivated by success and that you’re going to stick around.

While you don’t have to have an exact answer about the path you want your career to take, your answer should convey what you enjoy doing and what you’re good at. It’s also important that at least one component of your answer relates back to the job you’re interviewing for.

Here are some things to keep in mind when preparing your answer.

Be honest but don’t go into too much detail.

While it’s important to be honest in every part of the interview process, if the real answer to this question is “Not at this job,” or “Winning my first Oscar,” then we suggest focusing instead on what you can learn from the position and how those lessons will fit into your long-term career goals. Start by outlining a goal you’ve set for yourself and then explain why the role you’re interviewing for is an important part of your personal and professional growth.

Outline the steps you plan to take to reach your goals.

Once you’ve established your ideal career path, briefly outline the steps you intend to take to get there. For example, if your goal is to be a sales manager, explain how you plan to advance from an entry-level role to a more senior one.

Pro Tip: Keep your answer focused and concise — ideally no more than 1-2 sentences.

Show that you’re committed to sticking with the company.

Interviewers hiring for an internship or entry-level job are aware that you’re not going to be in that position forever, but they want to know that you’re committed to doing a good job while you’re there. The best way to convince them of that is to paint a picture of how the position aligns with your other goals and to show that you’re committed to making the most of the experience in every possible way.

Say something like: “In five years I see myself in a sales manager position where I am directly responsible for strategizing and implementing ways to increase my company’s annual revenue. I plan to start by working on small business sales and building my way up to mid-market sales within two years. My five-year goal is to move into enterprise sales and manage my own accounts with big companies. The most important thing though, is that I want to work for a company where I can really build a career and learn.”

Although you may not be sure of your long-term professional aspirations, answering this question is a great opportunity to show that you’re thoughtfully considering your future and looking for a role that will align with your goals, while also helping to shape those goals. This kind of thoughtfulness is likely to not only impress potential employers but to convince them that you’re worth investing in as an employee.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as A Job Guide in Psychology and find answers to common interview questions such as What Makes You Uncomfortable?

How to Answer: What Gets You Up in the Morning?

 

One of the most common questions you’ll encounter during an interview for an internship or entry-level job is: “So, what gets you up in the morning?” This question is meant to give the hiring manager an insight into what inspires you and gets you going.

Here are some things to keep in mind when preparing your answer.

Talk about what motivates you personally and professionally

The hiring manager is interested in more than your previous internship experience or the classes you’ve taken. They want to know what motivates you to get up every day, so be sure to tell them that. If you’re interested in leading your own team one day or learning a specific kind of skill, mention it and explain why it’s important to you.

Pro Tip: Don’t be afraid to talk about big goals. After all, there’s no better way to show that you’re truly motivated to succeed.

Give specific examples

Talking about what inspires you is a great start, but it’s important to back it up with concrete examples. Be sure to explain why it’s meaningful to you and how you plan to work it into your life. This is especially important if the goal is career related since you’ll want to show the steps you’re taking to achieve it.

Say something like: “I’m really motivated by helping kids from low-income backgrounds and I’ve done a lot of volunteer work in this area throughout my time in college. It’s easy to be passionate about something so meaningful, but it’s especially important to me because of my background and where I’m from.”

Explain how it has shaped your career path

Once you’ve explained your goal and outlined your plan for achieving it, connect your answer back to the position you’re applying for and show why you’d be an asset to the company. Be sure to demonstrate that you’ve truly thought about the position and how it will fit into your life.

Say something like: “I know I couldn’t have gotten to where I am today without the help of mentors from a local organization in my hometown. In fact, this volunteer work has been a major driver in my decision to start a career in elementary education and I’m looking for a position where I can develop the skills that will allow me to do that successfully.”

By talking about your future goals and how they inspire you, you’ll show the interviewer that you’re thinking ahead and taking proactive steps to shape your career. This is a great way to stand out from the crowd and help potential employers see your value.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How Do I Get a Job in Another City or State? and find answers to common interview questions such as Tell Me About a Time You Went Above and Beyond the Requirements for a Project.

How to Answer: Are You Willing to Relocate?

“Are you willing to relocate?” is one of the common interview questions you should be prepared to answer when you land an interview for a full-time, entry-level position. Typically, if relocation is required for a position, this is mentioned in the job description. But even if it’s not, it’s important to have a response ready in case it comes up during your interview.

Employers have several reasons for asking this question. The first, of course, is that the position you’re applying for does require you to move, or may require a transfer later on. But the interviewer may also be testing your commitment and enthusiasm for the role and the company, as well as your flexibility. Whatever the employer’s motivation for asking, you can answer honestly and still position yourself as an asset to the company.

Here are some tips for preparing your answer.

How to Answer “Yes”

If you’ve read the job description, assessed your situation and are willing to relocate, this answer is an easy one. In addition to revealing your willingness to relocate, you can also use this question as an opportunity to demonstrate what you know about the company, as well as remind the interviewer about the qualities that make you a strong candidate for the position.

Say something like: “Based on my skills and experience in this industry, I’m a good fit for this position and I’d be happy to relocate for the opportunity to work with your company.”

How to Answer “Maybe”

This is a valid answer, particularly if you don’t know what a relocation would entail. Would it be temporary or permanent? Would you be able to continue advancing your career? Will the company be helping you financially with the relocation? It might also depend on the location. Maybe you are willing to move within the United States but not internationally. If and when you receive a job offer, be sure to follow up with questions that will help you understand the specifics of the relocation.

Say something like: “I’m certainly interested in opportunities to advance my career. If a relocation would allow for that type of opportunity, I’m happy to consider it. Would this be for the New York or San Francisco office?”

How to Answer “No”

It’s not necessarily a dealbreaker if moving is not an option for you. You can be honest and present yourself as open to the idea in the future. When you answer, remain positive and explain your circumstances.

Say something like: “Unfortunately, moving is not an option for me right now. However, I can promise total commitment to the role. My circumstances may change in the future, and I would certainly consider it then.”

Having a ready answer to the question “Are you willing to relocate” demonstrates to the interviewer that you’ve thoughtfully and thoroughly prepared for the job interview. Whatever your answer, remain confident and focused on what you have to offer.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as Top 10 Things You Should Look for In an Internship and find answers to common interview questions such as If I Asked Your Friends to Describe You, What Would They Say?