How to Answer: Tell Me About a Time You Made a Mistake

Although no one likes talking about their mistakes, being able to discuss your past mistakes in a job interview can actually be a great way of impressing the interviewer. So when you encounter a question like, “Tell me about a time you made a mistake,” during an interview for an internship or entry-level job, you should focus on how you dealt with the mistake and what you were able to learn from it. When the hiring manager asks this question, it’s not because they’re trying to trip you up; rather, it’s a chance for the interviewer to see that you are able to acknowledge your mistakes and learn from them, two very important qualities. An employer would rather hire candidates who admit and grow from their mistakes than those who think they never make any.

As with any frequently asked question, it’s important to make sure you have an answer prepared before you go in for the job interview. These tips will help you describe a time you made a mistake in a way that will make it clear you’re the right person for the job.

Be honest

It’s important to be able to admit that you’re capable of making mistakes (as we all are), and that you’re willing and able to admit it. Therefore, you should refer to an actual mistake you made instead of attempting to appear that you don’t make any.

Take responsibility

It’s tempting to catalog how other people’s actions led to your error. But if you spend time during your interview talking about all the ways in which others — or the company itself — failed, you’re not actually admitting you made a mistake. Instead of pointing the finger at others, acknowledge the role you played. Your answer should be related to work; the interviewer doesn’t want to hear about the argument you had with your parents. Nor do you want to reveal any mistakes that could indicate a lack of professionalism on your part. Stick with school or work-related issues that stemmed from a true oversight or misunderstanding:

Highlight the resolution

Make sure to spend time discussing how you addressed the problem and outline the concrete steps to took to rectify it. The interviewer will want to know how you handle complications.

Emphasize lessons learned

Demonstrate that the mistake you made was not in vain. The interviewer wants to know that you can learn from your mistakes and take action to make sure they don’t happen again. By concluding the story of your mistake with what you learned, you can frame the incident in a positive light and show that you’re able to grow from your mistakes.

Say something like: “At my previous internship, I underestimated the amount of time I would need to work on a presentation for a team meeting. I was still getting used to the workflow in a busy office so I didn’t realize that I would need an extra few hours to put a deck together. Luckily, I managed to catch the mistake before the presentation was due to take place and asked my manager for help to complete it in time. It was a valuable lesson in time management and I’ve become better at prioritization and mapping out my schedule as a result of that experience.”

While it can be awkward to discuss mistakes you’ve made, your ability to do so is an asset. Interviewers know it’s a difficult question, and that’s why the right response will signal that you’re the right candidate for the job.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Dress for a Job Interview at a Nonprofit and find answers to common interview questions such as What Motivates You?

How to Answer: Tell Me About Yourself

“Tell me about yourself,” is one of the most frequently asked questions in an interview. In fact, it’s usually the first one. The key to answering it well is to be concise but informative. Keep the answer to under 60 seconds and focus on how your skills and personality traits are related to the position you’re interviewing for.

Approach it as if you just wrote an autobiography and you have to summarize it in four sentences. Focus on the highlights: Talk about where you’re from, your major and your future goals. Then add on a sentence at the end that describes why you’re sitting in the interview and why you’d be a good fit for the role.

Here’s how to do it.

Talk about your background.

Answering this question well is about more than just mentioning your skills or professional experience. It’s also about putting those things into context with the rest of your life. At the beginning of your answer you should explain where you’re from, where you’re attending school and what you’re majoring in.

Describe your interests.

Next, talk a little bit about your interests including what led you to apply for the role. For example, if you’re passionate about journalism, explain why the field excites you and why you’d like to be a part of it.

Mention your past experience.

Once you’ve described your interests, explain how your past internship and work experience have shaped your decision to seek out this role. If you don’t have previous experience in the field (or a related on) you can talk about relevant classes you’ve taken or transferable skills you’ve developed through class projects or extracurriculars.

Explain why you’re excited about the opportunity.

Wrap up your answer with one sentence explaining why you’re excited about this opportunity. Be sure to mention something you admire about the position or the company, and connect it back to your goals.

Say something like: “I’m originally from New York City and I’m currently a Junior at UT Austin. I decided to study English because I’ve always loved reading and writing and studying literature in general. I’m now looking to gain experience in the world of journalism, a field I’m passionate about because of its ability to inform and engage readers. I’ve written extensively for my campus newspaper, reporting on campus news and events, and I’m excited to gain more valuable reporting experience by working on the types of stories your company publishes.”

Once you have your answer nailed down, practice it in the mirror several times. This will help you get comfortable with all the points you want to emphasize and will ensure that you sound confident without being stiff.

Answering “Tell me about yourself” is the first step in connecting with your interviewer and a great chance to distinguish yourself from the majority of candidates who may be fumbling over their answer. So practice your story to make sure it reflects the thoughtfulness and detail you’ve put into your response and go into the interview confident that you’ll be putting your best foot forward.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as 6 Things to Do in Your First Week at a New Job and find answers to common interview questions such as Tell Me About an Accomplishment That You’re Most Proud Of.

How to Answer: What Are Your Strengths?

 “What are your strengths?” is a go-to question for interviewers. The key to answering it correctly is knowing that the hiring manager is trying to find out not only what you’re good at, but also how your skills match up with the company’s needs. This is closely related to “What can you offer us that someone else can’t?” another common question you’ll encounter during the interview process, and it’s a great chance to show off your professional strengths while demonstrating that you’re a great fit for the position!

Here are some tips to help you answer this question perfectly.

Highlight your top 3 strengths.

Before your interview, start by making a list of 10 skills and personality traits you’re proud of. This should include everything from your technical skills (like writing or knowledge of social media platforms) to soft skills like your ability to make friends easily (which shows that you’re a people person), and education-based skills such as training from college classes or past internships. If you need help coming up with this list, try brainstorming with friends or asking professors to weigh in on what they think you’re really good at. Once you have your top 10 strengths, narrow it down to the 3 things you’re most proud of. Be self-aware but not too modest. It’s totally okay to say that you’re a talented writer or a great programmer, and being confident will impress your interviewer.

Pro tip: Be creative! You might be awesome at punctuality, but your interviewer has probably heard that from lots of other candidates already. Instead, figure out what sets you apart and lead with that. For example, if you’re applying for a position where you’ll be managing projects and you have previous project management experience, this is a great time to mention that!

Give concrete examples.

Once you’ve figured out your top 3 strengths, come up with 1-2 examples to back up each one. If you’re going to say that one of your greatest strengths is being organized, then make sure you have evidence to prove that. Preparing a script of this can be a good idea. In addition to making you more comfortable with your answer, it’ll also help you sound more authentic because you’ll be confident that the things you’re talking about are things you’re really great at.

Say something like: “I’m really strong at communication, leadership and project management. Whenever I’m working on a group project, I naturally take on the role of project manager, leading the team by assigning tasks and making sure that everyone knows what they’re responsible for. At my last internship, I was asked to manage a project involving our team of interns. I took the lead on assigning tasks to the team and used the project management platform Trello to ensure that everyone was up to speed on what was expected of them. I also made sure that team members were communicating with each other on a daily basis so that we didn’t fall behind.”

Relate your strengths back to the job.

Once you’ve outlined your strengths and given solid examples of how you display them, wrap up your answer by connecting your strengths back to the position you’re applying for. You don’t need to focus on how your strengths relate to the job specifically (since this can sound too practiced), but do mention why these skills would make you an asset to any team.

Say something like: “We were able to complete the project on time and under budget, delivering a successful solution that our manager was able to share with a client. This made me realize that project management, leadership and communication are things I’m good at, and I’m excited to continue applying those skills in a professional setting.”

Here’s how to bring it all together:

“I’m really strong at communication, leadership and project management. Whenever I’m working on a group project, I naturally take on the role of project manager, leading the team by assigning tasks and making sure that everyone knows what they’re responsible for. At my last internship, I was asked to manage a project involving our team of interns. I took the lead on assigning tasks to the team and used the project management platform Trello to ensure that everyone was up to speed on what was expected of them. I also made sure that team members were communicating with each other on a daily basis so that we didn’t fall behind. We were able to complete the project on time and under budget, delivering a successful solution that our manager was able to share with a client. This made me realize that project management, leadership and communication are things I’m good at, and I’m excited to continue applying those skills in a professional setting.”

Answering “What are your strengths?” is a great chance to highlight the things you’re great at and to show a potential employer that you’ve thought about what will make you a great addition to the team. Even if the interviewer doesn’t ask this question directly, finding a way to relate your strengths to the job you’re applying for is a key component of impressing the interviewer. By coming up with your top 3 strengths and giving thoughtful examples of each, you’ll have no problem showing that you’re the best person for the job.

 

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Use Social Media to Network Online and find answers to common interview questions such as Are You Willing to Travel?

How to Answer: What Are Your Weaknesses?

“What are your weaknesses?” is the flip side of the coin to “What are your strengths?”  and a great chance to show potential employers that you’re proactive about self-improvement. There are two key parts to this answer: confessing your weaknesses and showing that you’re working to address them. It’s important to realize that the interviewer is less concerned with your specific weaknesses (after all, everyone has them) and more concerned with your self-awareness and desire to improve.

Here are some tips to help you nail this interview question.

Pick a weakness that doesn’t affect your ability to do the job.

Narrow down your answer to only your biggest weakness. Since the interviewer is really looking for candidates who are self-aware and proactively trying to improve, talking about one main issue will give you a chance explain the steps you’ve taken to address the problem and, more importantly, not give the interviewer a reason to turn you down.

The weakness you pick shouldn’t take away from your ability to do the job or to fit in with the company, but it also shouldn’t come across as unrealistic or staged. Don’t say something like, “I’m too much of a perfectionist.” Your interviewer probably won’t believe it (this is no one’s biggest weakness) and it doesn’t give you a lot of room to elaborate on how you’ve taken actionable steps to address the issue. Instead, focus on the things you’ve struggled with in the past, like managing your time when you a have a busy class schedule, not speaking up for yourself during a class project, or not asking for help when you need it.

Pro Tip: Keep this focused and concise. You want to give the interviewer the sense that you’re self-aware, but you don’t want to dwell on all the ways your weakness has held you back. Try to frame your weakness in one sentence.

Walk through the steps you’ve taken to address the problem.

Once you’ve opened up about your weak point, demonstrate your ability to problem-solve by talking about how you’ve worked through the problem and mention some of the successes you’ve had as a result. End on a positive note and, if possible, tie the positive outcome back to the job you’re interviewing for.

Say something like: I’ve always loved connecting with people and I tend to do that very well in person. However, my writing skills aren’t as strong as I would like them to be over email and in proposals. I’ve taken a writing class and I’ve seen my writing improve, but it’s something that I still need to work on. To make sure that I’m actively addressing the problem, I always ask for feedback when writing papers for class, and I include at least one English class in my schedule every semester. Although writing is one of my weaknesses, I’m taking active steps to get better and I know that I can become a good writer if I keep working on it.

Although identifying your weak points might be a bit uncomfortable at first, answering “What are your weaknesses?” is a great opportunity to show that you’re able to identify and address problems in a proactive way. This is a skill that employers always look for and something that will help you stand out in a pool of other candidates.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as What to Do When You Want a Second Job Offer and find answers to common interview questions such as Would You Describe Yourself as a Leader or a Follower?

How to Answer: What Motivates You?

 Some of the most common interview questions can also be the most challenging to answer. “What motivates you?” is a deceptively simple one. It can give your future employer a sense of your aspirations and long-term goals. It can paint a picture of why you get up in the morning and what makes you tick. How you choose to answer this question can either give a hiring manager a compelling reason to remember you or it can unintentionally leave you looking uncertain, or worse, indifferent.

This question can make or break your job interview, so here are a few key insights to consider as you prepare to answer: What motivates you?

Reflect.

If you try to come up with an answer to this question on the spot, you’ll likely sell yourself short. This is an opportunity to demonstrate strong self-awareness and it requires thoughtful reflection to get the answer just right. A helpful strategy can be to think about the times in your life where you felt the most driven and inspired, whether in a previous internship, in your classes, on a sports team or as part of another extracurricular activity. Personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator can also illuminate new ways to identify and articulate your passions and strengths. For example, if you find that you are most motivated while prepping for final projects or getting ready for a championship game, you can share that having clear and ambitious end goals is important to you.

It can be equally essential to reflect on what activities or spaces leave you feeling discouraged or unmotivated. Taking the time to identify these energy-drainers can help you avoid work settings that may not be a good fit, particularly if you’re looking for your first entry-level job and are still trying to understand type of job will work best for you.

Be authentic.

Hiring managers can quickly tell if you’re being genuine about your motivations. Generalized responses like “I love working with others” tend to be easily forgotten. Overly catered responses could look insincere. You are most compelling when you are authentic. Look at the job description and pull out what you are genuinely excited about. If you’re eager to work on a close-knit team and you see that this role has highly collaborative project management, that’s a great place to dive in. Alternatively, if you get energy from being around others, but this job has you doing predominately independent work like data analysis, that’s something you need to consider carefully.

Keep it concise, positive and connected.

“What motivates you?” is a broad question, so it can be tempting to rattle off a long list of things that get you excited to wake up in the morning, but a compelling response will be succinct, grounded in previous accomplishments, and connected to the job at hand. Curate a list of two to three key motivators accompanied by 1) a specific example of when this motivated you and 2) how you see this playing out in the job that you’re applying for.

Say something like: “I’m very motivated when doing work that positively affects others’ lives. As part of the community service that I do on campus, I had the opportunity to come up with a service project with other team members, and I found that I’m at my personal best when I have the chance to be both creative and service-oriented. I’m excited to see that this job also focuses on fostering a service-oriented mindset.”

Pro Tip: Whatever you say, don’t say money. Salaries are certainly important, but money should never be the primary motivating factor that you share in an interview.

Below are some potential motivating factors and ways to connect what motivates you to job descriptions:

Bringing out the best in others → Example: Laterally managing teammates to their greatest potential
Creative expression → Example: Innovating new solutions to complex problems
Working in teams → Example: Encouraging collaborative practices across teams and departments
Making a difference → Example: Upping the standards for inclusive processes
Winning or competing → Example: Setting and achieving ambitious goals in ambiguous contexts

Self-reflecting on the front-end and identifying what truly motivates you will not only narrow down your job search to a list of more meaningful opportunities, but it will also help you feel confident walking in on interview day. For other ideas on how to get noticed by hiring managers, check out our advice on how to stand out during a job search.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as Advanced Tips to Make Your Resume Stand Out and find answers to common interview questions such as What Was Your Favorite Class?

How to Answer: What are you Passionate About?

 The reason interviewers ask this question is because they’re trying to get a sense of who you are beyond your resume, and to know that you can commit to something and see it through to completion. This is a great chance for you to show what makes you a unique and well-rounded person and to demonstrate the value you could bring to the team!

Here are some interview tips that will help you nail this answer.

Talk about what excites you.

Your personal values and interests are part of what makes you unique, and talking about them is a great way of showing how your passions have shaped who you are both personally and professionally. Talking about what excites you is also a great way to humanize yourself in the interview and become more than just a resume. Plus, it’ll help the interviewer to remember you.

Show how you’ve made your passion a part of your life.

Whether you’re interested in animal rights or basketball, the passion itself is not as important as how you talk about it. Be specific and give the interviewer a sense of how that interest fits into your life. For example, if you’ve been an animal rights advocate for a long time and you volunteer at a shelter, explain how that experience has shaped you and what you’ve learned from it.

Say something like: “I’ve always loved animals and I had several dogs growing up. During my first semester of college, I started volunteering at the local animal shelter. I’m passionate about working with animals because so many pets end up abandoned and I want to help them find good homes.”

Pro Tip: Whatever your passion, make sure to clarify that devoting time to it won’t change the time and commitment you’re able to put into your work.

Show how your passions drive you to succeed.

Once you’ve established what your passions are and shown that you’re dedicated to them, talk about how those passions have driven you to succeed. This will show the interviewer that you’re able to use your personal interests to set goals and achieve them!

No matter what the passion, showing that you’re able to turn your interests into achievements is a great way to demonstrate long-term thinking and to show employers that you could help them meet their goals.

Say something like:Volunteering has given me the chance to not only work with animals but to also learn about nonprofit organizations, which has given me hands-on experience of company operations and helped to shape my career goals.”

Answering “What are you passionate about?” is a great way of showing potential employers that there’s more to you than what they can see on a resume. In addition to showing that you’re a well-rounded person, it’s also a great way to prove that you’re able to set goals and achieve results based on those goals. Added bonus: You may find out you have some things in common with the interviewer!

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Dress for a Job Interview at a Bank and find answers to common interview questions such as What Gets You Up in the Morning?

How to Answer: Tell Me About an Accomplishment That You’re Most Proud Of

One of the keys to a successful job interview is being able to highlight your accomplishments. When the hiring manager asks a question such as, “Tell me about an accomplishment that you’re most proud of,” they’re interested in finding out what you’ve achieved and what matters to you. This is a time when your interviewer wants you to show off, so don’t be shy. Make sure to come prepared with at least one example of your accomplishments, and use the S.T.A.R. method (which stands for situation, task, action, result) to describe your experience.

Here’s what to keep in mind as you prepare your answer.

Outline the situation

Think of something you’re truly proud of accomplishing. Whether this accomplishment happened in school, at a previous job or internship, or even during an extracurricular activity (like on a sports team), start your answer by talking about the events that led up to the moment. For example, if you’re most proud of leading your debate team to win Nationals, explain the situation that led up to that.

Talk about the task

Next, outline the task itself. Focusing on the debate team example, if were you in charge of motivating everyone with an epic speech or staying up all night to practice with a struggling teammate, this is the time to mention that. Explaining your role in the situation creates context for the story and gives the interviewer an idea of how you handle responsibilities and what you’re able to achieve.

Explain the action you took

Once you’ve outlined the task at hand, explain the steps you took to achieve your goal. Use one or two examples to back up your answer and show how these added value to the situation. For example, you can mention the plan that you created to keep everyone motivated and explain how you put it into action.

Highlight the results

Finally, be sure to mention the successful outcome and explain why you consider it to be your greatest accomplishment. The outcome itself doesn’t necessarily have to be a huge win, but it should be something that you’re truly proud of and that reflects well on you.

Say something like: “During my junior year, I led my debate team to Nationals after a successful season. I was in charge of making sure the team was still motivated and on top of their game after a pretty long season. I came up with a gameplan that combined debate practice with team building, dedicating extra time to two team members who didn’t have as much experience. We ended up winning Nationals and had an amazing time in the process.”

By following the S.T.A.R. method, you’ll be able to show off your biggest accomplishment and show the hiring manager that you’d be an asset to the team.

How to Answer: Tell Me About a Time You Failed

Although no one likes talking about a time they’ve failed, the truth is that everyone has experienced failure at some point in their lives. As Robert F. Kennedy famously said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” When employers ask this question during an interview for an internship or entry-level job, they’re interested in learning about your willingness to take risks and your ability to overcome challenges. In order to come up with an answer that shows that you’ve learned from your mistakes, you need to be able to demonstrate that you’ve successfully bounced back from failure and that you’ve learned important lessons along the way.

Pro Tip: Don’t be afraid to be honest. No one is perfect, and even the most successful people have failed more times than they can count. Instead of aiming for perfection by saying that you’ve never made a mistake, focus on how you can turn a negative into a positive.

Here are some things to keep in mind when preparing your answer.

Pick a real failure that you were able to learn from.

Think carefully about some of the biggest challenges you’ve faced during your life. Did they happen because you took a risk or tried something new? Or maybe you failed at something you’re normally very good at but circumstances got in the way. Whether your biggest failure was the Calculus test you didn’t pass in college or the track meet you lost in high school, the key to coming up with a great answer is to pick a situation where something went wrong but that something wasn’t catastrophic. This will make it easier to keep the story short and to focus on what you learned rather than how it felt to fail.

No matter what you choose, make sure you stay away from personal or overly emotional topics that don’t relate to the job at hand and could make the recruiter uncomfortable.

Outline the steps you took to overcome the challenge.

Once you’ve given some context for the situation and how it developed, outline the steps you took to get back on track. For example, if you’re talking about a test you failed, you can mention that you talked to your professor to get advice, then worked hard and went to office hours for extra help to make sure it didn’t happen again.

Pro Tip: Be detailed when outlining your approach. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not only proactive about problem-solving, but that you’re also able to think through the best ways to overcome a challenge.

Show how you were able to bounce back.

Finally, talk about what you learned. This is a great way to show the interviewer that you’re focused on personal and professional growth, and that you’re able to take even the most difficult situations and turn them into something positive. Most of all, you’ll be able to demonstrate that you’re resilient, a quality that employers always look for when screening candidates.

Say something like: “When I took Calculus my freshman year, I knew that I was in over my head. I’ve always been pretty good at math but the class was really challenging and I found myself falling behind. When I got my final grade and realized I had failed the class, I immediately went to talk to my professor and she helped me put together a plan for retaking the class and passing it. Over the course of the next semester, I went to office hours every week and asked a friend who was good at Calculus to help me with my homework. After struggling with that class, I realized that college was going to be much more challenging than high school, so I made sure to carefully look over the syllabus of every class I took and to set up meetings with professors to go through questions and ask for advice. I found that to be a great way of heading off potential problems and I managed to pass Calculus with flying colors the second time.”

Answering this question might seem challenging at first, but it can be a great opportunity to show the interviewer that you’re able to troubleshoot problems and to learn lessons that will serve you well in both your professional and personal lives.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Stand Out with Business Cards and find answers to common interview questions such as Would You Work Holidays and/or Weekends?

How to Answer: How Have You Displayed Leadership?

No matter what your major or chosen career path, one of the most common questions you’ll encounter during a job interview is “How have you displayed leadership?” When employers ask this question, it’s because they want to learn more about your personality and how you approach challenges. More specifically, they want to know whether you can take initiative and lead effectively when the occasion calls for it.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when answering this question.

1. Talk about a time you took on a leadership role.

The best way to do this is by recalling a positive, concise example of a time that you displayed leadership and doing your best to paint a picture of the situation. For example, if you organized a charity fundraiser for your sorority and raised a lot of money, be sure to mention that.

Pro Tip: If you can’t think of a relevant example from a previous job or internship, use a personal experience such as a time when you displayed leadership while volunteering, pursuing hobbies, participating in clubs or sports or tackling an academic project.

2. Demonstrate that you’re a team player who is able to get things done.

No one wants a leader who will come in, take charge and then not actually execute. Sure, it’s important to have someone managing a project, but it’s also important to show that you were able to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty. When outlining the steps you took to achieve your goal, be sure to talk about your ability to delegate tasks while also showing that you took on a fair number of tasks yourself. Going back to the charity event example, you can mention that you were able to keep everyone else organized while also tracking donations and figuring out the best way to draw attention to the event.

3. Highlight your accomplishments in a quantifiable way.

Anyone can come up with a ground-breaking idea, but not everyone can follow through with it. This is why it’s important wrap up your answer by showing how you worked to accomplish (and possibly exceed) your goal. If you can, talk about numbers. It’s easy to say that you made something a success with no real way to measure the outcome, but if you can prove that you were successful, for instance by showing that the event you planned raised over $50,000, that is a concrete example that your future employer can appreciate.

Say something like: “As president of my sorority, I was responsible for 80 chapter members. One of the biggest challenges was putting together our annual fundraiser for XYZ Charity, which hadn’t been all that successful in recent years. I organized dozens of members, created a spreadsheet to track donation progress and got several local celebrities to come to the event. In the end, the hard work paid off, and our chapter had the most successful year yet: We raised over $50,000 for the charity and won ‘Sorority of the Year’ on campus.”

By showing the employer that you’re able to take initiative and be a leader, you’ll be sure to impress them and get one step closer to landing the job.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as 10 Tips for the Perfect Cover Letter and find answers to other common interview questions such as What Are Your Strengths?

How to Answer: If I Asked Your Friends to Describe You, What Would They Say?

During an interview, hiring managers want to get a sense of who you are beyond your resume. The easiest way to do this is by asking questions designed to draw out your personality. One of these questions is, “If I asked your friends to describe you, what would they say?” This is a common question you may encounter during an interview for an internship or an entry-level job. When the interviewer asks this, it’s because they want to gauge how others perceive you, how self-aware you are and how you work with a team.

When preparing your answer to this question, you’ll want to highlight your positive personality traits and give concrete examples.

Pick a few of your best qualities.

There are many qualities that appeal to employers, including loyalty, hard work and leadership. When deciding what quality to highlight, make sure that it’s an accurate reflection of you and that you can back it up with examples how it has shaped your relationships with your friends.

Give specific examples of how you display them.

Are you the leader of the pack? Don’t be afraid to mention this. If you’re the go-to friend for making plans and executing them, this is definitely something you want to highlight to your future employer. Emphasize the leadership skills you possess and your experiences with being a leader.

Say something like: “My college friends would say that I’m the leader of the group, the life of the party and the caretaker. I’m always planning trips for us, including vacations to places we’ve never been before. Last summer, we decided to take a trip to Costa Rica and we were excited about it but didn’t know where to begin. I offered to research flights and hotels and managed to find us a great deal in a nice location. Once we got there, I made sure to look for fun places for us to go out and checked in to see how everyone was doing throughout the trip. We had a great time.”

Pro Tip: Keep your answer focused and concise. Now is not the time to reminisce about every experience you’ve had with your friends. Make sure you keep the conversation relevant to the position you’re interviewing for.

By talking about a great quality that your friends would praise, you’ll show the interviewer that you’re a team player and an asset to the organization.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Turn Down a Job Offer and find answers to common interview questions such as If You Could Invest in One Stock, Which Stock Would it Be?